The Odessa Record -

Recipe Column

Canning season has arrived

 


Much rejoicing could be heard around Odessa this past week as temperatures returned to normal hot weather as

apposed to the scorching of the previous couple of weeks. N

ever the less, Odessa cooks continue to search out and

implement the most efficient ways to prepare meals with out heating up the house.

Responding to my request for recipes, product selection and user tips, Irene Carnes shared the following

information about stand alone counter top pressure cookers. Irene got her Wolfgang Puck, 12 quart model on

January 7th, and says she hasn’t turned on the oven since.

The accompanying recipe book helped her get started and

then estimate how much time for converting her favorite

dishes to pressure cooking methods.

Irene’s model has a timer that you set for the amount length of cooking time. Other models and brands are

programmable, and like Irene's, most have the keep warm feature when cooking time ends. Irene didn’t offer any

particular recipes because she says she rarely follows one or makes a dish the same way twice.

Allrecipes.com, one of my favorite sites for quickly finding recipes has a selection of 64 pressure cooker recipes,

including one called Texas Venison, a spicy concoction mad

e with venison steak.

Fagor, a pressure cooker brand receiving high marks on several surveys, makes many pressure cookers in various

sizes, sporting a variety of convenient features. The Fagor website, http://www.fagoramerica.com, has an extensive recipe

library. Scroll to the bottom of the home page for the

Recipe Library tab. There is a small section of gluten free

recipes at this site.

Canning season has arrived. The first batch of Bread and

Butter Pickles are in the larder. A mildly sweet pickle,

these are easy for first time canners to prepare. This

recipe comes from my mother, the late Margaret Steinhaus. It is

an old time recipe of the boil and seal variety.

Bread and Butter Pickles

4 quarts thinly sliced cucumbers

3 large or 6 small onions, peeled and sliced thin

1 green pepper, diced

1 red pepper diced

1/3 cup pickling salt

6-8 cups ice cubes

3 cups cider vinegar

5 cups granulated sugar

1 1/2 tsp ground turmeric

1 1/2 tsp celery seed

2 Tbsp whole mustard seed

8 quart canning jars with lids and rings

In a large bowl, (8 quart or larger), layer cucumber slices, onion slices and diced peppers in 3 layers, with ice

cubes and salt between layers and on top. Refrigerate or set in a cool place for at least 3 hours or over night.

In a large non-reactive kettle, combine vinegar, sugar and

spices. Drain cucumber mixture well and add to kettle.

Place over medium heat and bring to a boil, stirring often.

Meanwhile set jars on a cookie sheet and place in 200 degree oven to heat. Place lids and rings in a saucepan of

hot water and keep warm on the lowest setting.

When mixture comes to a boil, quickly ladle into heated jars. Wipe rims clean with a damp paper towel. Place lids

with rubber side down and screw metal band on firmly tight.

Keep jars away from cold drafts until sealed and

cooled. You will hear a ping sound when the jars seal.

You may water bath process these jars if you like, only screw the bands on finger tight. With the modern lids, if

you screw them on firmly tight as all the old canning guides recommend, they are prone to not sealing.

Let the pickles stand in the jars 30 days before using for best flavor distribution. Yield: 4 quarts.

Jessica Kagele, owner of Wild Roots Farm, posted a page from Food in Jars, Six Ways to Preserve Zucchini. One

of those six ways is Zucchini Spread, I haven’t tried it

yet but it is in the plans for this week. Check out Wild Roots

Farm posts on Facebook to keep up to date on what locally grown produce is in season and more useful preserving

tips. If you can’t wait for me to test this recipe, go

to http://www.visitphilly.com and type Zucchini Spread in the search box.

Speaking of zucchini, here is a tip for all those who have a family member who can spot a 1/32nd size piece of

green zucchini skin in a chocolate cake from across the

room. Grate, dice or chop the zucchini as usual, then put it in

a blender or food processor along with recipe liquid and blend away. Since you have measured according to the

recipe before blending, it won’t change your recipe and those little eagle eyes will never find it. About the only thing

this won’t work in is a light colored cookie (a bit greenish).

Corn will soon be ripening and Corn Zucchini Quiche is a savory way to combine the fresh flavors of summer in a

guest worthy main dish. This is my rendition of a recipe I saw in a magazine.

Corn and Zucchini Quiche

1-2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil

2 ears corn, shucked and cut from the cob

1/8 inch long zucchini, sliced very thin

2 Tbsp butter

1/4 cup whole milk

3 large eggs

Salt and pepper

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese

2 Tbsp chopped fresh chives

1 clove garlic finely minced

1 prepared pie crust

Melt butter in a large skillet, add corn kernels and zucchini and sauté, stirring constantly until zuchinni is limp, toss in basil and set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, beat cream cheese until smooth

then beat in one egg at a time, then milk, salt and pepper

to taste, olive oil, chives and garlic. Stir in the sautéed vegetables then pour into prepared pie crust. Bake in

preheated 425 degree oven for 35 minutes or until golden brown and center is set. Yield: 6 servings.

The recipe for the Very Berry Cheesecake Salad that I have received so many request for was in the last column.

Copies of back issues are available for sale in The Odessa Record office.

Share your favorite summer recipes, canning and preserving tips, or pressure cooker recipes by sending them to:

Welcome to My Kitchen, c/o The Odessa Record, P,O,

Box 458, Odessa, WA 99159, email to

therecord@odessaoffice.com or drop them in the Welcome to My Kitchen mail tin in The Odessa Record office.

Water tomatoes and peppers in the cool of the evening when

they can better take in the moisture and grown during

the night.

 

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