The Odessa Record -

Garden+early fall bounty=multiple ideas for delicious, home-cooked meals

 
Series: Welcome to my Kitchen | Story 16

September 26, 2019



Deutschesfest is in the books for another year, and most of us have had our fill of German food for awhile. During all this festivity, the late peaches and tomatoes have ripened, and cucumbers and zucchini are making a last ditch effort at production. Following are recipes to help you take advantage of this early fall bounty.

Zucchini have enjoyed the rain and quickly produce huge fruit. Impossible Zucchini Pie can be made with any size zucchini, as it is grated for this recipe, and measured by weight. Also, you may use a gluten free baking mix if desired. This savory pie is based on a Bisquick Brand recipe, but I have tweaked it a lot.

Impossible Zucchini Pie

1 Tbsp butter

1/2 cup chopped onion

8 ounces coarsely grated zucchini, seeded if very large. 2 1/2 to 3 cups

1 cup grated Colby-Jack, Monterey Jack or Swiss cheese

3 eggs

1 1/2 cups milk

3/4 cup Bisquick baking mix

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp ground black pepper

1 tsp salt free seasoning ( I use the Kirkland Brand)

In a medium skillet sauté onion in butter until softened, add zucchini and cook stirring often until softened. Remove from heat and set aside.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Grease, or spray with cooking spray a 10 inch pie plate. Spread zucchini mixture evenly in the prepared pie plate. Sprinkle with the cheese.

In blender, combine the remaining ingredients and blend at medium high speed for one minute, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl halfway through. Pour mixture over the cheese and zucchini.

Place in preheated oven and bake 25 to 30 minutes until set and golden brown. Remove from oven and cool 5 minutes before serving. Yield: 6 servings.

Note: Salsa and sour cream a good accompaniments for this meatless main dish.

Bread and Butter Pickles make good use of end of the season cucumbers. These are usually odd shaped and various sizes, but when they are sliced thin for the recipe, size and shape is not noticed. This open kettle canning recipe is the same one my mother used, and though this style of canning is not recommended by the health department, it still works well and safely for high sugar/vinegar content recipes.

Bread and Butter Pickles

4 quarts thinly sliced cucumbers

6 medium onions, sliced

1 large green pepper

1 large red pepper

1/3 cup pickling salt

2 trays ice cubes (about 4 cups)

3 cups apple cider vinegar

5 cups granulated sugar

1 1/2 tsp ground turmeric

1 1/2 tsp celery seed

2 Tbsp mustard seed

4 quart jars, rings and lids

In an extra large glass or plastic bowl, layer, half the cucumbers, onion, peppers, salt and ice cubes, repeat with remaining ingredients. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

When ready to can, place cucumber mixture in colanders to drain.

Meanwhile, measure vinegar, sugar and spices into a 6 quart or larger kettle. Add the drained cucumber mixture. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring often. This takes a time, but is important to the canning process.

While mixture is coming to a boil, heat four quart jars on a baking sheet in a 200 degree oven. Place rings and lids in a sauce pan of hot water, and keep warm over low heat.

When mixture comes to a boil, remove from heat and quickly ladle into the hot jars. Wipe rims clean and top with lids and rings, screwing them on tight. After 5 minutes, re-tighten the rings. As the jars cool, they will seal. Best after 30 days in the jar. Yield: 4 quarts.

Oven Roasted Tomato Sauce, a recipe from the website, Feasting at Home, is an interesting method of preserving. The sauce is delicious, but the method a bit fussy. So, the second time I made it, there were adjustments made. This is my version.

Oven Roasted Tomato Sauce

3 Tbsp olive oil

4-6 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped

1 shallot or 6 green onions, chopped

1 Tbsp fresh oregano or 1 tsp dried

2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil

1 1/2 tsp salt

1/8 tsp ground black pepper

3 pounds ripe medium size tomatoes

1/2 tsp granulated sugar

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with heavy duty foil. Drizzle with the olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic, shallots and spices.

Cut tomatoes in half and place cut side down on garlic and spices. Bake 40 minutes.

Cool slightly and lift off skins with a fork. Place the roasted ingredients in blender with the sugar and puree until smooth. Use immediately or freeze for later use. Yield 4-5 cups sauce.

Over the years I have tried many recipes for Freezer Peach Pie Filling. I finally found one I like, and it is so easy to prepare, Based on a recipe by Tivertown on Allrecipes.com, I have adjusted the ingredient amounts for a 10 inch pie, and added cardamom to the nutmeg for spices.

Freezer Peach Pie Filling

6 cups peeled, sliced peaches

1 Tbsp lemon juice

1 cup granulated sugar

2 Tbsp cornstarch

1 Tbsp Minute Tapioca

1/8 tsp ground nutmeg

1/4 tsp ground cardamom

Place peaches in a large bowl and sprinkle with lemon juice. Gently stir in sugar, cornstarch, tapioca and spices until the sugar is mostly dissolved.

Place mixture in a gallon zip closure bag, then lay the bag in a 10 inch pie plate, pressing the mixture into the plate. Seal the bag and freeze until solid. Remove from pie plate and keep frozen until ready to bake, using your favorite pastry. No need to thaw. Bake at 450 degrees for 20 minutes, then 35 minutes at 350 degrees. Yield: one 10 inch pie.

Some recipe requests have come in for items donated to the Museum Bake Sale during Deutschesfest. Please share if you were the maker of the One Cup Cookies, Apple Crunch Muffins or the Breakfast Roll. Send all recipe submissions to: Welcome to My Kitchen, c/o The Odessa Record, P.O. Box 458, Odessa, WA 99159, email therecord@odessaoffice.com or drop them in the Welcome to My Kitchen mail tin in The Odessa Record office. Nights are getting colder, so it would be a good idea to cover, tomatoes, peppers and any other garden crop you are hoping to ripen before frosty weather sets in.

 

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